skip to content

Winton Centre for Risk and Evidence Communication

The Winton Centre for Risk and Evidence Communication is a new centre hosted within the Department of Pure Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics.

Endowed by a generous donation by the David and Claudia Harding Foundation and the Winton Charitable Foundation, we aim to ensure that quantitative evidence and risk is presented to people in a fair and balanced way.

All too often, numbers are used to try to bolster an argument or persuade people to make a decision one way or the other. We want to ensure that both risks and benefits of any decision are presented equally and fairly, and the numbers are made clear and put in an appropriate context.

We carry out our own research into how best to communicate numbers, and want to work with institutions all over the world to improve the way that important evidence is presented to all of us: whether it’s to make decisions as individuals (such as choosing a medical treatment), or as a part of society (such as choosing a policy to vote for).

Over the coming months, we will be growing our web and media presence. In the meantime, if you’d like to get in touch with a potential collaboration, or to be on our mailing list for press releases and infographics then email us at wintoncentre@maths.cam.ac.uk.

 

 

Latest news

Here we go again

22 March 2017

Guest blogger Michael Blastland points out the misleading reporting of statistics in a recent article in the Guardian and discovers that this time it was not so much the journalists to blame, but the academics that wrote the paper. Read full article on medium

The dangers of insecticides, poor statistics and over-enthusiastic press offices

2 March 2017

A paper published today in Occupational & Environmental Medicine was accompanied by a press release titled “ Exposure to certain insecticides linked to childhood behavioural difficulties” , and which made the bold claim that “ children with the highest levels of metabolites in their urine were around three times as...

Bad graphics: manipulation or laziness?

27 February 2017

Last week I sent a tweet of a graphic in the Daily Mail. Since it provoked a number of retweets I thought a blog on the subject would be worthwhile!

Elsewhere